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| construction_began = 1866
 
| construction_began = 1866
 
| construction_ended =
 
| construction_ended =
| opened = 1866
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| opened =
 
| closed =
 
| closed =
 
| demolished =
 
| demolished =
 
| current_status = [[Active Institution|Active]]
 
| current_status = [[Active Institution|Active]]
| building_style = [[Kirkbirde Planned Institutions|Kirkbride Plan]] (Mostly Demolished)
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| building_style = [[Kirkbirde Planned Institutions|Kirkbride Plan]]
 
| architect(s) =  
 
| architect(s) =  
| location = St. Peter, Minnesota
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| location =  
 
| architecture_style =  
 
| architecture_style =  
 
| peak_patient_population =
 
| peak_patient_population =
| alternate_names =<br>
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| alternate_names =  
*Minnesota Asylum for the Insane
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St. Peter Regional Treatment Center   
*St. Peter Regional Treatment Center   
 
 
}}
 
}}
  
 
==History==
 
 
The St. Peter State Hospital began in March 1866 when the Minnesota State Legislature responded to the need for an asylum by passing "an act for the establishment and location of a hospital for the insane in the state of Minnesota, and to provide for the regulation of the same." The act also created a board of trustees and appointed six commissioners responsible for recommending a permanent location for the state's hospital. A number of Minnesota communities vied for the facility and each claimed to be the most attractive village. However, on 1 July 1866, the commissioners made their recommendation. They opted for St. Peter as the permanent site. Citizens of that community purchased a 210 acre farm for $7,000 which was given to the state for the purpose. Shortly after the commission's report was filed, the board of trustees purchased the Ewing house in St. Peter for temporary use until construction was completed on the permanent hospital. The board of trustees estimated that the refurbished Ewing house with accommodations for fifty patients would exceed the state's demands for years.
 
The St. Peter State Hospital began in March 1866 when the Minnesota State Legislature responded to the need for an asylum by passing "an act for the establishment and location of a hospital for the insane in the state of Minnesota, and to provide for the regulation of the same." The act also created a board of trustees and appointed six commissioners responsible for recommending a permanent location for the state's hospital. A number of Minnesota communities vied for the facility and each claimed to be the most attractive village. However, on 1 July 1866, the commissioners made their recommendation. They opted for St. Peter as the permanent site. Citizens of that community purchased a 210 acre farm for $7,000 which was given to the state for the purpose. Shortly after the commission's report was filed, the board of trustees purchased the Ewing house in St. Peter for temporary use until construction was completed on the permanent hospital. The board of trustees estimated that the refurbished Ewing house with accommodations for fifty patients would exceed the state's demands for years.
  
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The postwar period brought prosperity, expansion, and new methods of treatment. Even the Great Depression had little negative impact on the institution because the Works Progress Administration provided funds for construction of a needed addition to the hospital's facilities. By the summer of 1939, the Board of Control was abolished and the Division of Public Institutions was created. This division within the Department of Social Security was responsible for the administration of the state's institutions while the remaining duties of the Board of Control were transferred to the Department of Social Welfare. After World War II, the institution continued to expand its facilities and enlarge its staff. By 1972, the St. Peter State Hospital consisted of over sixty buildings.<ref>From the Minnesota State University, Mankato, Memorial Library, Southern Minnesota Historical Center web page</ref>
 
The postwar period brought prosperity, expansion, and new methods of treatment. Even the Great Depression had little negative impact on the institution because the Works Progress Administration provided funds for construction of a needed addition to the hospital's facilities. By the summer of 1939, the Board of Control was abolished and the Division of Public Institutions was created. This division within the Department of Social Security was responsible for the administration of the state's institutions while the remaining duties of the Board of Control were transferred to the Department of Social Welfare. After World War II, the institution continued to expand its facilities and enlarge its staff. By 1972, the St. Peter State Hospital consisted of over sixty buildings.<ref>From the Minnesota State University, Mankato, Memorial Library, Southern Minnesota Historical Center web page</ref>
  
 
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== Images ==
== Images of St. Peter Hospital ==
 
{{image gallery|[[St. Peter State Hospital Image Gallery|St. Peter State Hospital]]}}
 
  
 
<gallery>
 
<gallery>
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File:Stpeter2.jpg
 
File:Stpeter2.jpg
 
File:StPeter Minn.jpg
 
File:StPeter Minn.jpg
File:StPeter Minn NurseHome.jpg
 
 
</gallery>
 
</gallery>
 
==Cemetery==
 
The location of the earliest cemetery at the St. Peter State Hospital is not known. The cemetery had wooden crosses for markers and a prairie fire erased all landmarks in a large area and the location of the cemetery was never found. The second hospital cemetery was in what is now Resurrection Cemetery, the cemetery & land on this side of the highway was later sold by the state but the cemetery continued as a Lutheran cemetery named Resurrection Cemetery. The third cemetery is located on the grounds of the current hospital but up on top of the hill from the hospital campus. All of these graves now have monuments with names as well as their original markers with numbers.
 
 
==Museum==
 
If you are looking to visit the St. Peter State Hospital Museum, please call 507-985-2249 to schedule a tour. It is located in the administration building of what remains of the Kirkbride. Facebook page is located [https://www.facebook.com/pages/St-Peter-State-Hospital-Museum/409331259151192 HERE]
 
 
==Video==
 
The following video was shot by the Minnesota Historical Society.  It shows the inside of the museum and also give a view of some of the un-restored sections of the hospital.   
 
 
<videoflash type="vimeo">23931320</videoflash>
 
 
 
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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[[Category:Kirkbride Buildings]]
 
[[Category:Kirkbride Buildings]]
 
[[Category:Active Institution]]
 
[[Category:Active Institution]]
[[Category:Articles With Videos]]
 
[[Category:Institution With A Cemetery]]
 
[[Category:Institution With A Museum]]
 
[[Category:Past Featured Article Of The Week]]
 

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