Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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(We're having a bit of an issue generating sized thumbnails in this portal. I don't have the time to debug it right now but it only affects this section.)
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{{FIformat
 
{{FIformat
|Image= Msh1.jpg
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|Image= coldwater1906.png
|Width= 250px
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|Width=  
|Body= [[Mendocino State Hospital]], originally the Mendocino State Asylum for the Insane, was established in 1889 (Statutes 1889, Ch. 23). By that law the Governor was authorized to appoint a board of directors of five members for a term of four years to select the site and to manage the institution. In October 1890, contracts were let out for the construction of the male ward building, connecting corridor, kitchen building, laundry, bakery, and the boiler and engine house. The contract for these buildings was for $182,520.  
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|Body= The [[Coldwater State Home|Coldwater Regional Mental Health Center]] opened in 1874 as the State Public School for Orphaned Children. The school was opened in Coldwater on May 21, 1874. Once admitted, children participated in "family-like" life in cottages and a placing-out program. A third of each day was used for schoolwork, a third for recreation and entertainment, and a third for acquiring work skills. Children learned reading, spelling, counting, calisthenics, singing, cyphering and slate drawing. By the turn of the century, the facility had become the only home in Michigan admitting both normal and handicapped children.  
 
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Revision as of 11:49, 14 January 2018

Featured Image Of The Week

coldwater1906.png
The Coldwater Regional Mental Health Center opened in 1874 as the State Public School for Orphaned Children. The school was opened in Coldwater on May 21, 1874. Once admitted, children participated in "family-like" life in cottages and a placing-out program. A third of each day was used for schoolwork, a third for recreation and entertainment, and a third for acquiring work skills. Children learned reading, spelling, counting, calisthenics, singing, cyphering and slate drawing. By the turn of the century, the facility had become the only home in Michigan admitting both normal and handicapped children.