Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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|Image= bba3295108d83d82ca8c2cfdd837f8eb.jpg
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|Image= KSHx1.jpg
 
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|Body= The [[Dexter Asylum]] served as an institution for the care of the poor, aged and mentally ill of Providence from 1828 to 1957. The Asylum began through a bequest in the will of Ebenezer Knight Dexter (1773-1824), a wealthy citizen who had served on a town committee for poor relief. Dexter's gift to the town, though much needed at the time, later was seen as an anachronism--a walled and isolated "poor farm" in the midst of Providence's residential east side. Beginning in the 1920's, city officials, developers and assorted heirs made several attempts to change the conditions of the will, and in 1957, they finally succeeded. The Dexter Asylum property was sold to Brown University.  
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|Body= On May 25, 1877, the [[Kankakee State Hospital|Illinois Legislature]] approved the building of a new hospital to serve the eastern part of the state. The legislation directed Gov. Shelby Cullom to appoint a group of seven commissioners who would choose a location for the new institution. Selection of the commissioners involved regional rivalries and other political considerations; the final makeup of that group could be vital in determining which town would be chosen. Many cities offered inducements by way of donations, for the location of the new hospital but the site finally selected was a farm of 250 acres near Kankakee, and this was subsequently enlarged by the purchase of 327 additional acres in 1881.      
 
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Latest revision as of 03:37, 4 April 2021

Featured Image Of The Week

KSHx1.jpg
On May 25, 1877, the Illinois Legislature approved the building of a new hospital to serve the eastern part of the state. The legislation directed Gov. Shelby Cullom to appoint a group of seven commissioners who would choose a location for the new institution. Selection of the commissioners involved regional rivalries and other political considerations; the final makeup of that group could be vital in determining which town would be chosen. Many cities offered inducements by way of donations, for the location of the new hospital but the site finally selected was a farm of 250 acres near Kankakee, and this was subsequently enlarged by the purchase of 327 additional acres in 1881.