Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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|Image= Salemtb2.jpg
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|Image= yarrabend.png
|Width= 500px
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|Width= 600px
|Body= Prior to this, in 1894, construction was started on [[Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital|a building designated to be the Oregon State Deaf-Mute School]], and was so occupied during the years of 1896 and 1897, but because of the inability to transport supplies over the nearly non-existent roads this building southeast of Salem was abandoned. After the Legislature enacted the laws for a sanatorium for treatment of the tubercular, one of the senators of that time saw this site, nestled in the foothills with available buildings, and action was taken to utilize this for the proposed Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital.    
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|Body= [[Yarra Bend Asylum|Yarra Bend]] was the first permanent institution established in Victoria that was devoted to the treatment of the mentally ill. It opened in 1848 as a ward of the Asylum at Tarban Creek in New South Wales. It was not officially called Yarra Bend Asylum until July 1851 when the Port Phillip District separated from the Colony of New South Wales. Prior to the establishment of Yarra Bend, lunatic patients had been kept in the District's goals. New admissions ceased in 1924 with the Asylum officially closing in 1925. All remaining patients were transferred to the Mont Park facilities.  
 
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Latest revision as of 04:30, 9 August 2020

Featured Image Of The Week

yarrabend.png
Yarra Bend was the first permanent institution established in Victoria that was devoted to the treatment of the mentally ill. It opened in 1848 as a ward of the Asylum at Tarban Creek in New South Wales. It was not officially called Yarra Bend Asylum until July 1851 when the Port Phillip District separated from the Colony of New South Wales. Prior to the establishment of Yarra Bend, lunatic patients had been kept in the District's goals. New admissions ceased in 1924 with the Asylum officially closing in 1925. All remaining patients were transferred to the Mont Park facilities.