Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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{{FIformat
 
{{FIformat
|Image= Salemtb2.jpg
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|Image= TopekaPC (4).JPG
|Width= 500px
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|Width= 600px
|Body= Prior to this, in 1894, construction was started on [[Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital|a building designated to be the Oregon State Deaf-Mute School]], and was so occupied during the years of 1896 and 1897, but because of the inability to transport supplies over the nearly non-existent roads this building southeast of Salem was abandoned. After the Legislature enacted the laws for a sanatorium for treatment of the tubercular, one of the senators of that time saw this site, nestled in the foothills with available buildings, and action was taken to utilize this for the proposed Oregon State Tuberculosis Hospital.    
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|Body= [[Topeka State Hospital|The first two ward buildings]], accommodating 135 patients, opened in 1879. Dr. Barnard Douglass Eastman resigned as superintendent of the asylum at Worcester MA to become the first superintendent at TSH. The institution was called the Topeka Insane Asylum until 1901 when the Legislature officially changed the name to Topeka State Hospital. Eastman told legislators that patients who were being released to make room for more patients were "well enough to be in a measure useful. All were of a quiet and harmless character."
 
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Latest revision as of 03:36, 12 January 2020

Featured Image Of The Week

TopekaPC (4).JPG
The first two ward buildings, accommodating 135 patients, opened in 1879. Dr. Barnard Douglass Eastman resigned as superintendent of the asylum at Worcester MA to become the first superintendent at TSH. The institution was called the Topeka Insane Asylum until 1901 when the Legislature officially changed the name to Topeka State Hospital. Eastman told legislators that patients who were being released to make room for more patients were "well enough to be in a measure useful. All were of a quiet and harmless character."