Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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|Image= binghamton11.png
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|Image= Woodmere1.jpg
 
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|Body= The New York State Inebriate Asylum, later known as [[Binghamton State Hospital]], was the first institution designed and constructed to treat alcoholism as a mental disorder. Located in Binghamton, NY, its imposing Gothic Revival exterior was designed by New York architect Isaac G. Perry and construction was completed in 1864. In 1993 the main building was closed due to safety concerns. The asylum appears on both the state and national lists of Historic Places, but it is currently in a state of disrepair and is one of the most endangered historical places in the nation, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1997.
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|Body= In 1883, Indiana's Legislature authorized funding for the construction of a new facility in Evansville to treat mentally ill patients. A secluded, densely wooded farm on Newburgh Road (now Lincoln Avenue), then three miles outside of the city, was selected as the site, and on Oct. 30, 1890, the new hospital admitted its first two patients. Known in its early years as Woodmere ("tranquility in the forest") and since 1927 as the [[Evansville State Hospital]], the hospital's gardens, poultry farm, livestock and orchards, spread out over nearly 900 acres, made it self-sufficient.    
 
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Latest revision as of 03:09, 10 November 2019

Featured Image Of The Week

Woodmere1.jpg
In 1883, Indiana's Legislature authorized funding for the construction of a new facility in Evansville to treat mentally ill patients. A secluded, densely wooded farm on Newburgh Road (now Lincoln Avenue), then three miles outside of the city, was selected as the site, and on Oct. 30, 1890, the new hospital admitted its first two patients. Known in its early years as Woodmere ("tranquility in the forest") and since 1927 as the Evansville State Hospital, the hospital's gardens, poultry farm, livestock and orchards, spread out over nearly 900 acres, made it self-sufficient.