Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

From Asylum Projects
Jump to: navigation, search
 
(54 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{FIformat
 
{{FIformat
|Image= Unitec Campus Carrington Rd.jpg
+
|Image= Woodmere1.jpg
 
|Width= 600px
 
|Width= 600px
|Body= [[Auckland Lunatic Asylum|The asylum underwent several name changes.]] It was known as Auckland Mental Health Hospital in 1959. In the 1960s, the work week averaged 60 hours and staff had only one day off each week. Avondale Mental Asylum became Oakley Hospital, a male forensic unit. The institute's centenary was celebrated in Oakley Hospital in 1966. The Auckland Psychiatric Hospital was officially renamed Oakley Hospital in 1962. After merging with Carrington Hospital, the hospital had 600 beds. In 1964, Dr. G.M. Tothill retired as medical superintendent and Dr P.P.E. Savage was appointed to take his place.  
+
|Body= In 1883, Indiana's Legislature authorized funding for the construction of a new facility in Evansville to treat mentally ill patients. A secluded, densely wooded farm on Newburgh Road (now Lincoln Avenue), then three miles outside of the city, was selected as the site, and on Oct. 30, 1890, the new hospital admitted its first two patients. Known in its early years as Woodmere ("tranquility in the forest") and since 1927 as the [[Evansville State Hospital]], the hospital's gardens, poultry farm, livestock and orchards, spread out over nearly 900 acres, made it self-sufficient.    
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 03:09, 10 November 2019

Featured Image Of The Week

Woodmere1.jpg
In 1883, Indiana's Legislature authorized funding for the construction of a new facility in Evansville to treat mentally ill patients. A secluded, densely wooded farm on Newburgh Road (now Lincoln Avenue), then three miles outside of the city, was selected as the site, and on Oct. 30, 1890, the new hospital admitted its first two patients. Known in its early years as Woodmere ("tranquility in the forest") and since 1927 as the Evansville State Hospital, the hospital's gardens, poultry farm, livestock and orchards, spread out over nearly 900 acres, made it self-sufficient.