Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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{{FIformat
 
{{FIformat
|Image= Unitec Campus Carrington Rd.jpg
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|Image= Augusta5.jpg
 
|Width= 600px
 
|Width= 600px
|Body= [[Auckland Lunatic Asylum|The asylum underwent several name changes.]] It was known as Auckland Mental Health Hospital in 1959. In the 1960s, the work week averaged 60 hours and staff had only one day off each week. Avondale Mental Asylum became Oakley Hospital, a male forensic unit. The institute's centenary was celebrated in Oakley Hospital in 1966. The Auckland Psychiatric Hospital was officially renamed Oakley Hospital in 1962. After merging with Carrington Hospital, the hospital had 600 beds. In 1964, Dr. G.M. Tothill retired as medical superintendent and Dr P.P.E. Savage was appointed to take his place.  
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|Body= [[Augusta State Hospital|Prior to mental health hospitals]], the mentally ill were the responsibility of their families, and if their families could not cope, they were either put in poor houses, put out on the streets, or locked away in jail. Mental health reformer Dorothea Dix (1802-1887), a native of Hampden, Maine, worked closely with the second superintendent of the Augusta asylum, Issac Ray (appointed in 1841). The building was state-of-the-art when constructed. All parts had ventilation, lighting, heating, and water. Men and women had separate wings.  
 
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Latest revision as of 04:11, 5 April 2020

Featured Image Of The Week

Augusta5.jpg
Prior to mental health hospitals, the mentally ill were the responsibility of their families, and if their families could not cope, they were either put in poor houses, put out on the streets, or locked away in jail. Mental health reformer Dorothea Dix (1802-1887), a native of Hampden, Maine, worked closely with the second superintendent of the Augusta asylum, Issac Ray (appointed in 1841). The building was state-of-the-art when constructed. All parts had ventilation, lighting, heating, and water. Men and women had separate wings.