Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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|Image= State-Hospital-Oct-1909 then.jpg
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|Image= callanpark1903m.png
 
|Width= 600px
 
|Width= 600px
|Body= [[Danville State Hospital|The plan adopted by this commission]], devised by John Mc Arthur, Jr., of Philadelphia, was the so-called Kirkbride system of connected wings, with a central administration building, 1143 feet in length, three stories in height, with three transverse wings on each side four stories in height, giving a capacity of 350 beds for each and accommodation for the necessary employees. The outer walls were constructed of stone procured from a quarry adjoining the property, stuccoed without, hand trowelled lime finish within, **ith brick partitions, hard-wood finish of Georgia pine, and slate roof, the construction being of the so-called slow-burning type. The building was fronted by a lawn of 45 acres, eventually laid out by Donald G. Mitchell, and, being on a slight eminence, overlooked the Susquehanna, which latter supplied the water and received the sewage.
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|Body= [[Callan Park Hospital for the Insane|The Colonial Government]] bought the whole 104.5 acres as a site for a new lunatic asylum to be designed according to the enlightened views of the American Dr Thomas Kirkbride. Colonial Architect James Barnett worked in collaboration with Inspector of the Insane Dr Frederick Norton Manning to produce a group of some twenty neo-classical buildings, completed in 1885 and subsequently named the Kirkbride Block, offering progressive patient care.    
 
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Revision as of 03:43, 24 January 2021

Featured Image Of The Week

callanpark1903m.png
The Colonial Government bought the whole 104.5 acres as a site for a new lunatic asylum to be designed according to the enlightened views of the American Dr Thomas Kirkbride. Colonial Architect James Barnett worked in collaboration with Inspector of the Insane Dr Frederick Norton Manning to produce a group of some twenty neo-classical buildings, completed in 1885 and subsequently named the Kirkbride Block, offering progressive patient care.