Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Image Of The Week"

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{{FIformat
 
{{FIformat
|Image= Augusta5.jpg
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|Image= Winslow Sanatorium.png
 
|Width= 600px
 
|Width= 600px
|Body= [[Augusta State Hospital|Prior to mental health hospitals]], the mentally ill were the responsibility of their families, and if their families could not cope, they were either put in poor houses, put out on the streets, or locked away in jail. Mental health reformer Dorothea Dix (1802-1887), a native of Hampden, Maine, worked closely with the second superintendent of the Augusta asylum, Issac Ray (appointed in 1841). The building was state-of-the-art when constructed. All parts had ventilation, lighting, heating, and water. Men and women had separate wings.  
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|Body= Part of a nationwide wave of funding to provide facilities for Native Americans suffering from tuberculosis in the 1930s, the [[Winslow Sanatorium]] was authorized by Congress in 1931. Construction was begun by a Texas company, McKee, in 1932 with the facility opening to its first patients from the Hopi and Navajo reservations in 1933. Registered as a hospital with the American Medical Association, it was officially known as Winslow Sanatorium. The following year operations were transferred from the federal government to the Navajo Health Authority, who operated it until it again became a federal facility under the Indian Health Service in 1948, when it fully became a general hospital.
 
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Revision as of 02:49, 12 April 2020

Featured Image Of The Week

Winslow Sanatorium.png
Part of a nationwide wave of funding to provide facilities for Native Americans suffering from tuberculosis in the 1930s, the Winslow Sanatorium was authorized by Congress in 1931. Construction was begun by a Texas company, McKee, in 1932 with the facility opening to its first patients from the Hopi and Navajo reservations in 1933. Registered as a hospital with the American Medical Association, it was officially known as Winslow Sanatorium. The following year operations were transferred from the federal government to the Navajo Health Authority, who operated it until it again became a federal facility under the Indian Health Service in 1948, when it fully became a general hospital.