Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= Hastings State Hospital Nebraska
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|Title= Gartnavel Royal Hospital
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|Body= With the population of the state increasing, the need for another hospital became evident, and in 1887, the legislature appropriated $75,000 for a "state asylum for the incurably insane" to be located at Hastings if the city would donate 160 acres of land for the purpose. The citizens of Hastings purchased 160 acres one mile west of the city limits. The land area was eventually increased to 630 acres. Patients were first received at the hospital on August 1, 1889 when forty four were transferred from Lincoln. Melvin Meals was assigned Number One and remained a patient until his death in 1895. Through 1916, 4,115 patients had been received. In December, 1916 there were 1,152 inmates, 405 women and 747 men.
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|Body= The Committee of Management of the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum was formed in 1804. Construction of the Asylum commenced in 1810 and was completed in 1814. Originally opened as the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum in 1814 in the Cowcaddens area of Glasgow, it became the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum in 1824. In 1843 the Asylum moved to new premises at Gartnavel which, like the previous buildings, were designed to facilitate segregation both by gender and social class. Substantial extensions were added in 1877, 1937 and 1959. In 1824 a royal charter was obtained, in 1931 the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum was renamed the Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital and the present name was adopted in 1963. Construction of the adjacent Gartnavel General Hospital commenced in 1968 and as a result some sports and recreational facilities of the psychiatric hospital were lost.
  
Charles C Rittenhouse, Hastings architect, drew the plans for the building which was a three story brick with a tall central tower. In 1891 the north and south wings were added to the original building and in 1902 the North Annex was erected. In 1904 an amusement hall was built where dances and entertainments were held for patients. During this period the farm cottage and two greenhouses were built. In 1914 a large dairy barn was built and a herd of Holstein cows milked each day. A medical surgical building was erected in 1926, and in 1938 a psychiatric hospital was built. In 1957 the All Faiths Chapel was built with funds from thousands of donors.
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Towards the end of the nineteenth century the proportion of pauper lunatics at Gartnavel began to decline as parochial asylums came into being. After its transfer to the National Health Service Gartnavel continued to have a substantial proportion of paying patients. Industrial/occupational therapy was formally introduced in 1922 and a psycho–geriatric unit was established in 1972. From 1948 until 1968 Gartnavel had its own Board of Management for Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital.  [[Gartnavel Royal Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
 
Politics were the essential requisite for the job of superintendent in the early days of the institution. Dr. M. W. Stone, the first superintendent, came from Wahoo in May, 1889.  [[Hastings State Hospital Nebraska|Click here for more...]]
 
 
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Latest revision as of 05:15, 24 May 2020

Featured Article Of The Week

Gartnavel Royal Hospital


gartnavel5.png

The Committee of Management of the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum was formed in 1804. Construction of the Asylum commenced in 1810 and was completed in 1814. Originally opened as the Glasgow Lunatic Asylum in 1814 in the Cowcaddens area of Glasgow, it became the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum in 1824. In 1843 the Asylum moved to new premises at Gartnavel which, like the previous buildings, were designed to facilitate segregation both by gender and social class. Substantial extensions were added in 1877, 1937 and 1959. In 1824 a royal charter was obtained, in 1931 the Glasgow Royal Lunatic Asylum was renamed the Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital and the present name was adopted in 1963. Construction of the adjacent Gartnavel General Hospital commenced in 1968 and as a result some sports and recreational facilities of the psychiatric hospital were lost.

Towards the end of the nineteenth century the proportion of pauper lunatics at Gartnavel began to decline as parochial asylums came into being. After its transfer to the National Health Service Gartnavel continued to have a substantial proportion of paying patients. Industrial/occupational therapy was formally introduced in 1922 and a psycho–geriatric unit was established in 1972. From 1948 until 1968 Gartnavel had its own Board of Management for Glasgow Royal Mental Hospital. Click here for more...