Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

From Asylum Projects
Jump to: navigation, search
(23 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{FAformat
 
{{FAformat
|Title= Concord State Hospital
+
|Title= Tarban Creek Lunatic Asylum
|Image= Concord4.jpg
+
|Image= Gladesville11.JPG
 
|Width= 150px
 
|Width= 150px
|Body= From the time of the admission of the first patient, October 29, 1842, to March 31, 1886, a period of 43 years, 5 months and 2 days, 4,890 persons were admitted to the asylum and received its care. Of this number, 1,777 were "cured" and able to resume their places in society. A further 1,139 persons under care and treatment, but who did not fully recover mental health, left the institution for care in family settings. Of this class, a considerable number were convalescent on leaving, and fully recovered afterwards. The records show only 878 discharged whose diseases were not either removed or mitigated. 776 have died at the asylum since its opening. Total population of the asylum in 1916 is 960, and there are about 100 left in the various almshouses.
+
|Body= On 13 January 1835 Governor Bourke sent a despatch to Britain stating "A lunatic asylum is an Establishment that can no longer be dispensed with. In this Colony, the use of ardent spirits induces the disease called delirium tremens, which frequently terminates in confirmed lunacy. The present asylum is a wretched hired Building without outlet of any kind." In his reply dated 3 August 1835, Lord Glenelg conveyed the British Government's authorisation for expenditure of NSW Colonial government funds for this project.
  
In hospital construction since the year 1882 the detached pavilion plan has been the favorite method of construction adopted by the trustees. The Twitchell house, the Bancroft building, the hospital building, and the new group for working patients are all detached buildings connected with the main building by long subways for the economical distribution of heat, water and electricity. In the convalescent buildings for both men and women every attempt has been made to secure the conditions of the private house and home as far as is possible.
+
On 24 April 1837 Governor Bourke reported that the new asylum was approaching completion, and since he considered it impossible to find persons qualified for its superintendence in NSW, he requested that a married couple be engaged and sent out from England as Keeper and Matron. The new Superintendent and Matron, Mr and Mrs Digby, took up residence at Tarban Creek Lunatic Asylum on 18 August 1838, with the first patients transferred from Liverpool Asylum and the Female Factory, Parramatta, arriving on 19 November 1838.
  
At the farm colony an attempt has been made to establish conditions of life exactly as they exist on the ordinary New England farm. Much has been done in the culture of small fruits, in the raising of chickens and eggs, as well as the care of stock. It is to be hoped in the near future, when sufficient land is acquired in this locality, that a milk farm can be maintained. A nucleus has already been started in the building of a modern cow barn at this farm.  [[Concord State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
+
Following the recommendations of the Select Committee on the Lunatic Asylum in 1846, changes to administration, staffing, and record keeping occurred. Of major concern was the perceived lack of expert medical direction, resulting in the appointment on 1 January 1848 of a medical superintendent, Dr Francis Campbell, to administer the institution.  [[Tarban Creek Lunatic Asylum|Click here for more...]]
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 03:36, 24 January 2021

Featured Article Of The Week

Tarban Creek Lunatic Asylum


Gladesville11.JPG

On 13 January 1835 Governor Bourke sent a despatch to Britain stating "A lunatic asylum is an Establishment that can no longer be dispensed with. In this Colony, the use of ardent spirits induces the disease called delirium tremens, which frequently terminates in confirmed lunacy. The present asylum is a wretched hired Building without outlet of any kind." In his reply dated 3 August 1835, Lord Glenelg conveyed the British Government's authorisation for expenditure of NSW Colonial government funds for this project.

On 24 April 1837 Governor Bourke reported that the new asylum was approaching completion, and since he considered it impossible to find persons qualified for its superintendence in NSW, he requested that a married couple be engaged and sent out from England as Keeper and Matron. The new Superintendent and Matron, Mr and Mrs Digby, took up residence at Tarban Creek Lunatic Asylum on 18 August 1838, with the first patients transferred from Liverpool Asylum and the Female Factory, Parramatta, arriving on 19 November 1838.

Following the recommendations of the Select Committee on the Lunatic Asylum in 1846, changes to administration, staffing, and record keeping occurred. Of major concern was the perceived lack of expert medical direction, resulting in the appointment on 1 January 1848 of a medical superintendent, Dr Francis Campbell, to administer the institution. Click here for more...