Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= Kew Lunatic Asylum
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|Title= Concord State Hospital
|Image= kew1885.png
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|Image= Concord4.jpg
 
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|Body= The Kew Asylum was first opened in 1871 as a ward of Yarra Bend. For a short period Kew was also known as the "Metropolitan Asylum". Many of Kew's early patients were transferred from Yarra Bend and the Collingwood Asylum. In October 1872 Kew was proclaimed a separate institution from Yarra Bend.
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|Body= From the time of the admission of the first patient, October 29, 1842, to March 31, 1886, a period of 43 years, 5 months and 2 days, 4,890 persons were admitted to the asylum and received its care. Of this number, 1,777 were "cured" and able to resume their places in society. A further 1,139 persons under care and treatment, but who did not fully recover mental health, left the institution for care in family settings. Of this class, a considerable number were convalescent on leaving, and fully recovered afterwards. The records show only 878 discharged whose diseases were not either removed or mitigated. 776 have died at the asylum since its opening. Total population of the asylum in 1916 is 960, and there are about 100 left in the various almshouses.
  
After World War II there was a period of significant change in the treatment and prognosis for people with a mental illness. Drugs such as Lithium carbonate (discovered in 1948 by Australian psychiatrist Dr John Cade) and chlorpromazine (discovered in 1950's) lead to improvements in treatment. Thus many people with a mental illness could in many cases be treated in hospital for a shorter period and return to the community. The Mental Health Act of 1959 designated hospitals providing short-term diagnosis and accommodation as "psychiatric hospitals". Therefore any institution could have a section designated as a mental hospital for long-term or indefinite hospitalisation and a section designated as a psychiatric hospital for short term diagnosis and treatment of acute psychiatric illness.
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In hospital construction since the year 1882 the detached pavilion plan has been the favorite method of construction adopted by the trustees. The Twitchell house, the Bancroft building, the hospital building, and the new group for working patients are all detached buildings connected with the main building by long subways for the economical distribution of heat, water and electricity. In the convalescent buildings for both men and women every attempt has been made to secure the conditions of the private house and home as far as is possible.
  
In 1962 the decision was made to no longer house acute or short-term patients at Kew and therefore it was formally proclaimed a Mental Hospital under the Mental Health Act of 1959. Up until this time, Kew Mental Hospital was still colloquially known as 'Kew Asylum'.  [[Kew Lunatic Asylum|Click here for more...]]
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At the farm colony an attempt has been made to establish conditions of life exactly as they exist on the ordinary New England farm. Much has been done in the culture of small fruits, in the raising of chickens and eggs, as well as the care of stock. It is to be hoped in the near future, when sufficient land is acquired in this locality, that a milk farm can be maintained. A nucleus has already been started in the building of a modern cow barn at this farm.  [[Concord State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
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Revision as of 02:20, 16 August 2020

Featured Article Of The Week

Concord State Hospital


Concord4.jpg

From the time of the admission of the first patient, October 29, 1842, to March 31, 1886, a period of 43 years, 5 months and 2 days, 4,890 persons were admitted to the asylum and received its care. Of this number, 1,777 were "cured" and able to resume their places in society. A further 1,139 persons under care and treatment, but who did not fully recover mental health, left the institution for care in family settings. Of this class, a considerable number were convalescent on leaving, and fully recovered afterwards. The records show only 878 discharged whose diseases were not either removed or mitigated. 776 have died at the asylum since its opening. Total population of the asylum in 1916 is 960, and there are about 100 left in the various almshouses.

In hospital construction since the year 1882 the detached pavilion plan has been the favorite method of construction adopted by the trustees. The Twitchell house, the Bancroft building, the hospital building, and the new group for working patients are all detached buildings connected with the main building by long subways for the economical distribution of heat, water and electricity. In the convalescent buildings for both men and women every attempt has been made to secure the conditions of the private house and home as far as is possible.

At the farm colony an attempt has been made to establish conditions of life exactly as they exist on the ordinary New England farm. Much has been done in the culture of small fruits, in the raising of chickens and eggs, as well as the care of stock. It is to be hoped in the near future, when sufficient land is acquired in this locality, that a milk farm can be maintained. A nucleus has already been started in the building of a modern cow barn at this farm. Click here for more...