Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= Florida State Hospital
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|Title= Rochester State Hospital
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|Image= 10-18-2007-13a.jpg
 
|Width= 150px
 
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|Body=  The Florida State Hospital, established in 1876, is located at Chattahoochee in the panhandle of Northwest Florida. It is on the site of an old United States Arsenal, which was built in 1834, just below the junction of the Flint and the Chattahoochee River, to command the ships on the Apalachicola River.
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|Body=  By a special law passed by the Legislature of 1873 and amended in 1874 a tax of $10 on all liquor dealers was assessed to raise a fund for the establishment of a state inebriate asylum which, when completed, was to be maintained by a continuation of the same tax. As soon as a sufficient fund was accumulated the Inebriate Asylum Board purchased a farm of 160 acres, within a mile and a half of the City of Rochester, for $9000, secured plans and began building in 1877. Strong opposition was raised by liquor dealers against this tax as discriminating and unjust. Test cases were tried in the courts and the constitutionality of the law was sustained. At the same time it became apparent and was admitted generally that additional room was much more urgently needed for the care of the rapidly increasing insane of the state than for the care of inebriates. The Legislature of 1878, in view of this and of the determined opposition to an inebriate asylum to be built and maintained on such a plan, repealed the act levying the tax and changed the inebriate asylum to the Second Minnesota Hospital for Insane, which title was later changed to the Rochester State Hospital (in 1883), with the proviso, however, that inebriates should be admitted and cared for and treated at the expense of the state on the same basis as the insane. Accordingly a separate ward was maintained for inebriates until the department was abolished by the Legislature in 1897.  [[Rochester State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
 
Florida State Hospital was originally a Federal Arsenal, built by the U.S. Army to be used as an arms depot during the second Seminole Indian War. It was used by the Freedman's Bureau from 1865 to 1868, and then served as the state's first penitentiary. Two of the original buildings still remain; the Officer's Quarters, which now serves as the Florida State Hospital Administration Building, and a Powder Magazine, which is currently being restored for eventual use as a museum and conference center.
 
 
 
The facility remained Florida's only state mental institution until 1947 and continues today to be the largest of a statewide system of treatment centers for individuals with mental and physical disabilities. It is listed on the National Historic Registry.  [[Florida State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
 
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Revision as of 03:52, 21 June 2020

Featured Article Of The Week

Rochester State Hospital


10-18-2007-13a.jpg

By a special law passed by the Legislature of 1873 and amended in 1874 a tax of $10 on all liquor dealers was assessed to raise a fund for the establishment of a state inebriate asylum which, when completed, was to be maintained by a continuation of the same tax. As soon as a sufficient fund was accumulated the Inebriate Asylum Board purchased a farm of 160 acres, within a mile and a half of the City of Rochester, for $9000, secured plans and began building in 1877. Strong opposition was raised by liquor dealers against this tax as discriminating and unjust. Test cases were tried in the courts and the constitutionality of the law was sustained. At the same time it became apparent and was admitted generally that additional room was much more urgently needed for the care of the rapidly increasing insane of the state than for the care of inebriates. The Legislature of 1878, in view of this and of the determined opposition to an inebriate asylum to be built and maintained on such a plan, repealed the act levying the tax and changed the inebriate asylum to the Second Minnesota Hospital for Insane, which title was later changed to the Rochester State Hospital (in 1883), with the proviso, however, that inebriates should be admitted and cared for and treated at the expense of the state on the same basis as the insane. Accordingly a separate ward was maintained for inebriates until the department was abolished by the Legislature in 1897. Click here for more...