Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= Foxboro State Hospital
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|Title= Menniger Clinic
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|Body= The Massachusetts Hospital for Dipsomaniacs and Inebriates was designed by architect Charles Brigham, and opened in 1889 to treat alcoholics. In 1905 the hospital began to treat psychiatric disorders, and by 1910 it was solely a psychiatric institution, and became known as Foxboro (or Foxborough) State Hospital. The hospital ceased most of it's operations in 1976, but the buildings have been used for other purposes such as file storage and haunted houses during the Halloween season. The layout of this institution was very unique; the original inebriate asylum consisted of a few isolated buildings that were later connected by very long hallways, which served as day rooms. Patient rooms were in wings that branched off to the sides, and the newest additions (circa 1950's) were dormitories that were covered in tile. Many cupolas adorn the roof, and the basement holds a surprisingly large eight body morgue. There are two cemeteries nearby holding around 1,100 patients with headstones marked with only a patient number and a grave number.
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|Body= The Menninger Foundation of Topeka, Kansas, began as an outpatient clinic in the 1920s serving the local Shawnee County populace for a variety of ills. Karl Menninger began persuading his father Charles Frederick, or C.F., to focus the clinic's area of expertise on psychiatric and mental health cases. The Menningers opened the first clinic in 1919. In 1925 they purchased a farmhouse on the outskirts of town to for a sanitarium to provide long-term in-patient care. William Claire Menninger, Karl's youngest brother, joined Karl and their father in this practice that same year, fulfilling C.F.’s dream of a group practice with his sons.
  
The Foxboro State Hospital closed in 1976, however many parts of the building were put to re-use by various government entities. The hospital's Theatre was also home to the Foxboro Jaycee's haunted house one year. In 2004 the property was sold to a developer and early constrction began, and early in 2006 the buildings were almost completely prepared for either demolition or restoration. In July, 2006 a four-alarm fire ripped through a ward of the main hospital building. The fire was mostly contained to that one ward. By 2009 a large portion of the older buildings had been converted to condominiums & office space.  [[Foxboro State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
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The sanitarium began expanding almost immediately. The Menninger family opened other operations, including Southard School for children, one of the first such institutions for children with mental health disabilities. The family also began training psychiatric professionals and performing research, as well as publishing in the Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. During the 1930s Will and other Menninger staff formulated and refined their milieu therapy, a treatment program focusing on the whole individual and every staff member’s interaction with a patient.
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Karl became a popularly respected and well-known figure in psychiatry after the publication of his first book in 1930 and writing a regular advice column in the Ladies’ Home Journal. Will, like many other Menninger staff, joined the armed forces during World War II; by the end of the war he was a brigadier general and extremely influential in the treatment and care of soldiers with psychiatric problems.  [[Menniger Clinic|Click here for more...]]
 
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Latest revision as of 03:28, 12 January 2020

Featured Article Of The Week

Menniger Clinic


KSmenningermainbldg.png

The Menninger Foundation of Topeka, Kansas, began as an outpatient clinic in the 1920s serving the local Shawnee County populace for a variety of ills. Karl Menninger began persuading his father Charles Frederick, or C.F., to focus the clinic's area of expertise on psychiatric and mental health cases. The Menningers opened the first clinic in 1919. In 1925 they purchased a farmhouse on the outskirts of town to for a sanitarium to provide long-term in-patient care. William Claire Menninger, Karl's youngest brother, joined Karl and their father in this practice that same year, fulfilling C.F.’s dream of a group practice with his sons.

The sanitarium began expanding almost immediately. The Menninger family opened other operations, including Southard School for children, one of the first such institutions for children with mental health disabilities. The family also began training psychiatric professionals and performing research, as well as publishing in the Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. During the 1930s Will and other Menninger staff formulated and refined their milieu therapy, a treatment program focusing on the whole individual and every staff member’s interaction with a patient.

Karl became a popularly respected and well-known figure in psychiatry after the publication of his first book in 1930 and writing a regular advice column in the Ladies’ Home Journal. Will, like many other Menninger staff, joined the armed forces during World War II; by the end of the war he was a brigadier general and extremely influential in the treatment and care of soldiers with psychiatric problems. Click here for more...