Difference between revisions of "Portal:Featured Article Of The Week"

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|Title= Eloise Asylum
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|Title= Eastern Oregon State Hospital
|Image= Eloise13.png
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|Image= Pendleton.jpg
 
|Width= 150px
 
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|Body= In 1839, only two years after Michigan had joined the Union, Wayne County paid $800 to buy a 160-acre farm in Nankin Township (now Westland). The purchase included a log cabin known as the Black Horse Tavern. The County erected an addition to the tavern building and used it to house 35 needy people, a keeper and his wife. They called it the Wayne County Poorhouse. Its first residents were transferred from another poorhouse at Gratiot and Mt. Elliott in Detroit . Many refused to move, claiming the new poorhouse was "too far out in the wilderness." And they were right -- at that time the corner of Michigan and Merriman was nearly two days by stage coach from Detroit.
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|Body= Eastern Oregon State Hospital was created by statute in 1909 and formally opened in Pendleton, Oregon in January 1913. The functions of the hospital were to diagnose mental illness, provide treatment, and release patients who had satisfactorily responded to treatment; to investigate patients admitted and their family histories to determine the cause of a person's mental illness; to provide for humane custodial care to those for whom curative treatment was ineffective; to manage social and recreational programs for patients; to utilize patients for the maintenance and upkeep of buildings and grounds; and to assist in the protection of the patient's financial and business interests.
  
But that was what the county officials had in mind. They wanted somewhere well out of sight to send what they saw as society's dregs -- the vagrants, vagabonds, drunkards, pilferers and brawlers. With such a broad charter, it wasn't long before the feeble-minded and the insane were being housed there. Records show that a Biddy Hughes was Eloise's first official mental patient, committed by her family in 1841. She was in her mid-30s when admitted and was kept there until her death 58 years later.
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In 1965, the hospital became the Eastern Oregon Hospital and Training Center. In 1969, their goals were the restoration of patients to mental and physical health, economic self sufficiency, and if possible, the return of the patient to the community.
  
Prior to the 1840s, little distinction was made between rational and mentally ill inmates. A county report from the 1840s made reference to harsh restraints used to separate the mentally ill from other inmates. The mentally ill were housed on the upper floor of a farm building used to keep pigs.  [[Eloise Asylum|Click here for more...]]
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With a decline in the patient population, the 1983 Legislative Assembly authorized the establishment of a three hundred and fifty bed medium security prison at the Eastern Oregon Hospital and Training Center. The facility opened in 1985 as the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution.
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On January 1, 1985, the Eastern Oregon Hospital and Training Center became the Eastern Oregon Psychiatric Center (EOPC) and the Eastern Oregon Training Center (EOTC). Both centers serve the sixteen central and eastern counties, with EOPC being a sixty bed inpatient facility for mentally and emotionally disturbed people. EOTC is a ninety bed training center for developmentally disabled residents.  [[Eastern Oregon State Hospital|Click here for more...]]
 
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Revision as of 04:48, 15 November 2020

Featured Article Of The Week

Eastern Oregon State Hospital


Pendleton.jpg

Eastern Oregon State Hospital was created by statute in 1909 and formally opened in Pendleton, Oregon in January 1913. The functions of the hospital were to diagnose mental illness, provide treatment, and release patients who had satisfactorily responded to treatment; to investigate patients admitted and their family histories to determine the cause of a person's mental illness; to provide for humane custodial care to those for whom curative treatment was ineffective; to manage social and recreational programs for patients; to utilize patients for the maintenance and upkeep of buildings and grounds; and to assist in the protection of the patient's financial and business interests.

In 1965, the hospital became the Eastern Oregon Hospital and Training Center. In 1969, their goals were the restoration of patients to mental and physical health, economic self sufficiency, and if possible, the return of the patient to the community.

With a decline in the patient population, the 1983 Legislative Assembly authorized the establishment of a three hundred and fifty bed medium security prison at the Eastern Oregon Hospital and Training Center. The facility opened in 1985 as the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution.

On January 1, 1985, the Eastern Oregon Hospital and Training Center became the Eastern Oregon Psychiatric Center (EOPC) and the Eastern Oregon Training Center (EOTC). Both centers serve the sixteen central and eastern counties, with EOPC being a sixty bed inpatient facility for mentally and emotionally disturbed people. EOTC is a ninety bed training center for developmentally disabled residents. Click here for more...