Difference between revisions of "Creek Orphan Asylum"

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Revision as of 13:33, 6 June 2018

{{infobox institution | name = Creek Orphan Asylum | image = | image_size = 250px | alt = | caption = | established = | construction_began = | construction_ended = | opened = 1891 | closed = 1943 | demolished = no | current_status = [[campus in use, OSUIT) | building_style = Dormitory Plan | architect(s) = | location = Okmulgee, OK | architecture_style = | peak_patient_population = 115 | alternate_names =

}}

History

Built in 1891 northeast of Okmulgee's downtown district, the Creek Orphan Asylum housed and gave an English education to as many as 99 orphans at a time with a 9 month school year. In 1894, the Creek National Council approved the addition of 640 acres to the orphanage to be used as farm, garden, orchard, and cattle pasture. Children admitted to the orphanage were required to stay until the age of 21, and children were only allowed to return home during the summer break if their family made a formal request. The famous Muskogee (Creek) poet Alexandar Posey served as superintendent of the orphanage for 2 years starting in 1895, and wrote 3 notable poems in his first year there. In 1904 statehood was approved for Oklahoma, and the home reverted to a residence until the Federal government purchased the land during WWII. Before the purchase, in 1937, Johnson Tiger is recorded as superintendent of the orphanage. In 1943, the US government built Glennan Military Hospital on the former site of the school/residence. The military hospital was used to treat mostly African POW's coming from other prison camps. The military hospital camp was flanked by barbed wire with ditches dug around the perimeter. The hospital remained in operation until 1945, when the POWs were returned to their homes. Shortly after 1945, the US government agreed to allow the Oklahoma A&M College system to purchase the campus for $1 million, and OK A&M opened a Tech School on campus on the basis of providing job skills to veterans. Programs on offer consisted of; diesel mechanics, baking, shoemaking, dry cleaning, watchmaking, electronic repairs, construction, and plumbing. Students attending brought their families with them, and the barracks were converted to student living quarters. The land/buildings are currently still owned by Oklahoma State University and is their Technical Trainingc college (OSUIT).